College of Education and Human Development - George Mason University
Graduate School of Education - George Mason University

Our Graduate School of Education is the alma mater for one third of teachers and administrators in Northern Virginia’s world-class school systems. Each year, more than 3,000 graduate students enroll in our innovative academic programs, which include advanced study for teachers and school leaders, instructional design and technology, and a renowned PhD in Education program that is among the largest in the country.

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School of Recreation, Health, and Tourism - George Mason University

The School of Recreation, Health, and Tourism (SRHT) offers exciting, career-ready majors in dynamic fields such as athletic training, tourism and events management, health and physical education, kinesiology, sport management, and recreation management. SRHT features renowned faculty, cutting-edge research, six laboratories and centers, and a diverse student body of more than 1,000 undergraduate and graduate students each year. Each major requires one or more internship or clinical experiences, ensuring that students graduate not just with a transcript but with a resume that demonstrates their professional aptitude and skills.

PhD, George Mason University
Assistant Professor
Professor-in-Charge, Sp Ed: Visual Impairments
Helen A. Kellar Institute for Human disAbilities

Contact Information

Send email to Dr. Avila

Phone: (703) 993-5625
Fax: (703) 993-3681

George Mason University
Fairfax Campus
Finley Building 203A
4400 University Dr.
MS 1F2
Fairfax, VA 22030

Recent Publications

Avila, K. (2015). Voices from the classroom. In M. E, King-Sears, R. Janney, & M. E. Snell (Eds), Collaborative Teaming. (pp. 113-114). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.   

Avila, K (2014). IEP essentials. In J. Gorman (Ed), Raising a child with albinism: A guide to the school years. (pp. 139-158). East Hampsted, NH: NOAH.    

Avila, K. (2014). Transition to adulthood. In J. Gorman (Ed), Raising a child with albinism: A guide to the school years. (pp. 277-294). East Hampsted, NH: NOAH.

Avila, K. (2014). Preliminary college selection and campus compass, appendix D.  In J. Gorman (Ed), Raising a child with albinism: A guide to the school years. (pp. 318-327)  East Hampsted, NH: NOAH.

Avila, K. (2012). Braille babies: strategies to promote pre-reading skills in young children with visual impairments. IPVI INSIGHTS, Illinois Association for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments: IPVI. Chicago, IL.      

Avila, K. (2012). Braille babies: strategies to promote pre-reading skills in young children with visual impairments. Awareness (Winter) Waterton, MA: NAPVI.    

                Avila, K. (2010). Meeting Mariamu. Albinism Insight (Spring), 23-24.

               Dubois, S. (Ed.) (2008). Raising a child with albinism: A guide to the early years.  East Hampstead, NH: NOAH.

Contributing author of approximately 60 pages:

  • Early intervention and education for students with albinism
  • Orientation and mobility: overview and strategies
  • Developmental considerations and strategies
  • Sensory stimulation and visual efficiency   
  • Accommodations, modifications and adaptive devices/technologies.   

 

             Avila, K. (2008). Resources for children with visual impairments. Preemies Today, (June), 5.

            Avila, K. (2007). Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act – IDEIA 101. Preemies Today: Fairfax, VA, 3-5.

            Avila, K. (2003). Six steps to college success. National Federation of the Blind of Virginia.

           Avila, K (2003). EXPLORE the possibilities: An approach to transition. The Braille Forum, XLI (7).  

           Avila, K. (2002). EXPLORE the possibilities: An approach to transition.  FCPS Teacher Research. Fairfax County Public Schools.  Fairfax, VA.

          Waegele, K. (1999). Rights and responsibilities in higher education. The Student Advocate. XVII(II).