Participating GMU Faculty

The core group of participating faculty at GMU includes the following:

Fred Bemak

Founder and Director of the Diversity Research and Action Consortium. Dr. Fred Bemak is a tenured full professor in the College of Education and Human Development since 2000. He has directed federal, state, and privately funded human services programs, and had done consultation, training, and research with culturally diverse populations and public and private human services organizations locally, nationally, and internationally. Prior coming to George Mason University, Dr. Bemak was a Professor and Section Head for Counselor Education, School Psychology, and Rehabilitation Services at Ohio State University and former Associate Professor and Chair of the Counseling and Development program at Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Bemak has published extensively in the fields of cross-cultural and multicultural psychology and counseling, working with at-risk youth, and immigrant and refugee mental health and psychosocial adjustment. He co-authored a book with Dr. Rita Chi-Ying Chung and Paul Pedersen entitled Counseling Refugees: A Psychosocial Approach to Innovative Multicultural Interventions and has authored numerous journal articles and book chapters in these areas. He has written a book with Dr. Rita Chi-Ying Chung entitled Social Justice and Multiculturalism: Application, Theory and Practice in Counseling and Psychotherapy which is expected to be published soon.

Dr. Bemak continues to present and offer training nationally and internationally and was recently the program evaluator for a 6 country cross-border child trafficking program in Asia. He is active in the American Counseling Association and the American Psychological Association.

Dr. Bemak founded Counselors Without Borders as a component of DRAC. After Hurricane Katrina and the San Diego Wildfires Drs. Bemak and Chung organized and brought teams of mental health counselors to the region to provide counseling and support.

Awards

Frank Blechman

Co-Founder and Senior Project Coordinator of the Diversity Research and Action Consortium. Mr. Blechman worked at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR) from 1992-2002. He has provided consultation and training for numerous private and public agencies on policy and program service delivery. An emphasis of his consultation, training, and research has been with culturally diverse populations and programs.

Dr. Rita Chi-Ying Chung

Prior to coming to George Mason University, Dr. Chung was an Assistant Professor at Ohio State University, a Project Director for the National Research Center on Asian American Mental Health at UCLA, a consultant for the World Bank, and was an adjunct faculty for Johns Hopkins University and George Washington University. Before coming to the United States Dr. Chung lived in the Brazil, England, Hong Kong, New Zealand and the Philippines. Dr. Chung has published extensively in the fields of cross-cultural and multicultural psychology and counseling. She co-authored a book with Drs. Fred Bemak and Paul Pedersen entitled Counseling Refugees: A Psychosocial Approach to Innovative Multicultural Interventions and authored numerous journal articles and book chapters on immigrant and refugee mental health and psychosocial adjustment and cross-cultural issues in psychology and counseling. She has written a book with Dr. Fred Bemak entitled Social Justice and Multiculturalism: Application, Theory and Practice in Counseling and Psychotherapy that will be published soon. Dr. Chung is also currently analyzing data collected on inter ethnic race relations with African American and Asian Americans and will be working on a larger study of inter ethnic group relations with African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latino Americans. She has consulted throughout Asia, the South Pacific, and Latin America, and was recently an invited presenter at the United Nations on child trafficking. In addition, Dr. Chung was invited a made a film on immigrant mental health through the American Psychological Association. Dr. Chung received two American Counseling Association Presidential appointments as Chair of ACA International Committee and Committee Member of ACA Human Rights Committee

Awards

Dr. Rachael D. Goodman

Dr. Rachael D. Goodman is an Assistant Professor in the Counseling and Development Program at George Mason University. Dr. Goodman's interests include infusing social justice and multicultural perspectives throughout counseling and counselor training. In particular, her research examines culture-centered trauma counseling, disaster response, and transgenerational trauma. She works collaboratively in communities and schools examining issues of oppression, resilience, and social action. Dr. Goodman also seeks to provide opportunities for counseling students to engage in community outreach and action research. She has facilitated counseling outreach trips both nationally and internationally to provide post-disaster and trauma counseling. Dr. Goodman's research interests also include: counseling for liberation, critical consciousness, and mindfulness.

Dr. Eric Shiraev

Dr. Eric Shiraev is based in the Department of Public and International Affairs and Department of Psychology in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at George Mason university. He took his academic degrees at St.Petersburg University in Russia and completed a post-doctoral program at UCLA. He is an author, co-author, and co-editor of twelve books and numerous publications in the fields of international relations, political psychology, Russian, and comparative studies. He develops a distinct multi-disciplinary approach to government, social, and political behavior and emphasizes the role of elites in individual socialization and political processes. Besides teaching and scholarly work, Eric Shiraev writes briefs and opinion essays for government, nongovernment organizations, and the media.

Dr. Regine Talleyrand

Dr. Talleyrand is an Associate Professor and Program Coordinator for the Counseling and Development program in the Graduate School of Education at George Mason University. She does is responsible for the administration of the Counseling and Development program and is responsible for coursework, research, and outreach in the Community Agency Counseling track of the Counseling and Development program and has worked with numerous community organizations. She teaches the Assessment and Appraisal in Counseling, Practicum, and Internship classes in the program. Dr. Talleyrand completed her Ph.D. in August 2001 from the University of Maryland. Her area of study was counseling psychology.

Dr. Talleyrand's research interests focus on the use of racial identity theory, acculturation, and multicultural competencies to support the development of new physical and mental health models for people of color. Her primary area of study includes examining the relationship between stress, race and eating disorders in Black women. She is the primary investigator for a Mason Summer Research grant that has supported her study of eating disorders in Black college women. She has served as a reviewer for the Journal of Black Psychology and Assessment. Dr. Talleyrand has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. She also received a Master of Arts degree in Human Development from the University of Maryland.

Toni Travis

Associate Professor of Government and Politics. She has taught and conducted research in American government on the racial/gender dimensions in elections, racial/ethnic public policy issues, and urban politics. She co-authored The Meaning of Difference which examines race, gender, social class, and sexual orientation. She has served as a political analyst on Virginia and national politics on C-span, CNN, Fox Morning News, and the local affiliates of NBC, CBS, and ABC. Currently, she is the host of Capital Region Round table, a public affairs television show. Professor Travis teaches urban politics, American government, and Virginia politics. She is currently doing research on urban politics, race and class issues in politics.

Dr. Joseph Williams

Dr. Joseph Williams is an Assistant Professor in the Counseling and Development Program in the Graduate School of Education at George Mason University. His research interests include the development, implementation, and evaluation of resilience-based interventions aimed at promoting the overall well-being of underserved children and families in high-risk circumstances. Dr. Williams' research has been presented at a variety of national and state-level organizational conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. More recently, Dr. Williams helped develop, implement, and evaluate a career development intervention called Project H.O.P.E. (Healthcare, Occupations, Preparation and Exploration), with over 600 underserved middle and high school students—with large populations of Mexican immigrant and African Americans students. Project H.O.P.E., worked with K-12 educational systems in the state of Iowa to provide students with early exposure to the STEM related careers, as one means of remedying the lack of diversity in STEM fields. His program responsibilities included: metric selection & monitoring, outreach, program design (STEM pathways), assessment, dissemination/outreach, and documentation/reporting. Dr. Williams completed his Ph.D. in Counselor Education with a cognate in Social Work from the University of Iowa in 2011. He also received his Masters of Science Degree in mental health counseling from Minnesota State University.

Board of Advisors

There will be a representative Board of Advisors comprised of a diverse group of leaders in the Northern Virginia area from respective county, public, and private agencies and programs. This board will guide and review the work and practices of the Consortium. Fifteen board members will include representation from the major ethnic groups and key human services organizations working with diverse groups in the Northern Virginia region.