College of Education and Human Development - George Mason University
Graduate School of Education - George Mason University

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The School of Recreation, Health, and Tourism (SRHT) offers exciting, career-ready majors in dynamic fields such as athletic training, tourism and events management, health and physical education, kinesiology, sport management, and recreation management. SRHT features renowned faculty, cutting-edge research, six laboratories and centers, and a diverse student body of more than 1,000 undergraduate and graduate students each year. Each major requires one or more internship or clinical experiences, ensuring that students graduate not just with a transcript but with a resume that demonstrates their professional aptitude and skills.

PhD, Union Institute and University
Associate Professor
Transformative Teaching

Contact Information

Send email to Dr. View

Phone: (703)-993-8327
Fax: (703)-993-8144

George Mason University
Arlington Campus
Founders Hall 736
MS 2A6
VA

Profile

Jenice View is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education. Prior to joining the GMU faculty in 2005, Dr. View spent more than twenty years working with a variety of nongovernmental organizations to create space for the voices that are often excluded from public policy considerations: women, people of color, poor urban and rural community residents, and especially youth. She has also been an educator in a variety of classroom and community settings, including as a middle school humanities teacher at a DC public charter school, as the education and training director of a national environmental justice and labor organization, and as a professional development trainer of in-service classroom teachers.

She is a co-editor of the 2012 book, Why public schools? Voices from the United States and Canada. She is also a co-editor of Putting the movement back into civil rights teaching, winner of the 2004 Philip Chinn award from the National Association of Multicultural Education and Honorable Mention from the Gustavus Meyers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, and designated an "enduring classic" in 2011 by the Southern Poverty Law Center's Teaching Tolerance. Her GMU-TV show, Urban Education: Issues and Solutions, has received multiple awards, including the 2012 Communicator of Distinction award, and the prestigious 2011 Gracie Award. Her work has received several grants, including a 3-year $1 million US Department of Education Teaching American History Grant for work in southwestern Mississippi; two multi-year grants from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation to Teaching for Change totaling $1.3 million; grants totaling over $60,000 from the US National Park Service for her work on Learning Historic Places with Diverse Populations; and a $4000 research grant from the GMU Provost's Office. She received the 2013 Faculty/Staff Vision Award from GMU’s Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Multicultural Education. She has presented workshops and presentations in a variety of national and international settings on the subjects of civil rights education, arts integration, popular education, labor education, environmental justice, and youth development. A native of Washington, DC, she has a B.A. in economics and international relations from Syracuse University, an MPA-URP in development studies and urban and regional planning from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. in education from the Union Institute and University.

Research Interests

Critical teacher professional development, History education, Civil rights and labor education, The uses of arts integration, Teaching for social justice

Recent Publications

Books

View, J.L., Laitsch, D. & Earley, P.M. (Eds.) (2013).  Why Public Schools:  Voices from the US and Canada, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, Inc.

Menkart, D., Murray, A.M., & View, J.L. (Eds.) (2004) Putting the Movement Back into Civil Rights TeachingA Resource Guide for Classrooms and Communities, Washington, DC: Teaching for Change and the Poverty and Race Research Action Council

Book Chapters

View, J.L. & Azevedo, P. (in press). Learning Historic Places with Diverse Populations: Teacher-ranger partnerships, in J.L.Thompson & A.K. Houseal (Eds.) America’s Largest Classrooms: What We Learn from Our National Parks, Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Interior

View, J.L. & Guiden, A. (in press). Learning Historic Places with Diverse Populations:  Student perceptions case study, in J.L Thompson & A.K. Houseal (Eds.) America’s Largest Classrooms: What We Learn from Our National Parks, Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Interior.

View, J.L. (2017). Teaching the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi: Teacher professional development and CRT/RPCK, in P. Chandler and T. Hawley, Race Lessons: Using Inquiry to Teach about Race in Social Studies, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Press

Solis, R., Cook, C. & View, J.L. (2017). Universidad Sin Fronteras: Transgressing intellectual borders and redefining learning, Cambridge Handbook of Service Learning and Community Engagement.

View, J.L. (2016).  Challenging historical fear and loathing: Black historyinstruction in the United States (case study), Chapter Eight: Transforming Black history in lessons and beyond the classroom in the United States and Britain: three case studies in A. Mohamud & R. Whitburn, eds. Doing Justice to History: Transforming Black History in Secondary Schools, London: Trentham Books, pp. 137-144.

View, J.L. (2014).  Commentary on essay by Chambers, J., Boger, J.C. & Tobin, W., How colleges and universities can promote K-12 diversity: A modest proposal, in America’s Growing Inequality: The Impact of Poverty & Race Ed., Chester W. Hartman, Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 275-287.

View, J.L. (2013).  I was and am:  Historical counter-narrative as nonviolent resistance in the United States, in Exploring the Power of Nonviolence:  Peace, politics, and practice, Amster, R. & Ndura-Ouedraogo, E. (eds.) Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, pp. 57-77.

View, J.L. (2010) Critical history teaching: Towards a human rights agenda for pre- and in-service teachers, in R. Hoosain & F. Salili (Eds.), Democracy and Multicultural Education, in the series "Research in Multicultural Education and International Perspectives" Charlotte, NC:  Information Age Publishing, Inc, pp. 149-172

View, J.L. (2000) Inviting youth into civic action, in D. Weil and H.K.Anderson (Eds).,  Perspectives in critical thinking: Essays by teachers in theory and practice.  New York: Peter Lang Publishers, pp. 95-138.

Journal articles

View, J.L., Kaul, A., & Guiden, A. (in press).  Timeline of race and education in the United States. In D. Menkart, A. Murray, J.L.View (Eds.) Putting the movement back into civil rights teaching: A resource guide for classrooms and communities, 2nd Edition. Washington, DC: Poverty and Race Research Action Council and Teaching for Change.

View, J.L. & Kaul, A. (in press).  Mapping race and racism in Illinois, in P. Reid-Merritt (Ed.)  A state by state history of race and racism in the United StatesSanta Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO/Greenwood

View, J.L. & Hanley, M.S. (2016, June 21).  The playwright within: Fun, freedom and agency, Urban Education, doi:10.1177/0042085916654524

View, J.L., Hall, B., DeMulder, E., Stribling, S., Dodman, S., Ra, S., & Swalwell, K. (2016, August) Equity audit: A teacher leadership tool for nurturing teacher research. The Education Forum 80(4), 380-393, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00131725.2016.1206162

DeMulder, E.K., View, J.L. & Stribling, S.M. (2016). Teacher Leadership in International Schools: Opportunities and Limitations. 50th Anniversary InterEd Edition of the Association for the Advancement of International Education, pp. 100-103.

View, J.L. & Azevedo, P.C. (2015, November/December).  Attempting to teach and interpret beyond standardized tests:  Learning Historic Places with DiversePopulations. Legacy Magazine: National Association of Interpretation.

Swalwell, K., Pellegrino, A., & View, J.L. (2015). Teachers' curricular choices when teaching histories of oppressed people: Capturing the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. Journal of Social Studies Research 39 (2), pp. 79-94.

Hanley, M.S. & View, J.L. (2014, December). Poetry and drama as counter-narrative. Cultural StudiesÛCritical Methodologies special issue, 14(6), pp. 558-573.

View, J.L. (2013). Pens and ploughshares:  The historical use of art by African-descended women to create social justice in the U.S. Neo-slavery era, in The International Journal of Education in the Arts 14(2.5),1-21.

View, J.L., DeMulder, E., Stribling, S. (Feb, 2013). Developing empowering educational experiences through creative practices and teacher research. Proceedings: Conference on Higher Education Pedagogy. Blacksburg, VA: Virginia Tech University.

View, J.L., DeMulder, E., Stribling, S. (Feb, 2013). Developing empowering educational experiences through creative practices and teacher research. Proceedings: Conference on Higher Education Pedagogy. Blacksburg, VA: Virginia Tech University.

View, J.L., Hanley, M.S., DeMulder, E. & Stribling, S. (2012). Journey from Trepidation to Theory:  P-12 teacher researchers and creativity. LEARNing Landscapes, 6(1).

View, J.L. (2012).  Trapped by bubble sheets:  Teachers struggling to deepen their historical knowledge, special issue Transformations: Journal of Inclusive Scholarship and Pedagogy, 12(2),58-75

View. J.L. & Frederick, R.M. (2011) Sneaking out of the big house?: Perceptions of African American mentees in a graduate level teacher education program on a white campus, in Journal of Negro Education, 80(2), 134-148.

View, J.L. & Boles, L. (2010). "Environmental Justice Leaders to Discuss Key Issues:  Climate Justice, Green Jobs, and Equity" in Environmental Justice; 3(1), 33-35.

Frederick, R. M. & View, J.L. (2010).  Re-examining the delivery of a diversity course in the 21st Century:  Rethinking our role as teacher educators, in Race Gender and Class, 17(1-2), 118-127

View, J.L., DeMulder, E., Stribling, S., & Kayler, M. (2009) Cultivating transformative leadership in P-12 schools and classrooms through critical teacher professional development, Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, 3(2), 39-53.

View, J.L. & DeMulder, E. (2009) Teachers as artists, intellectuals and citizens:  A critical framework for teacher education, Democracy and Education, 18(2), 33-39.

Frederick, R. & View, J.L. (2009) Facing the rising sun:  A history of Black educators in Washington DC 1800-2007, Urban Education, 44(5), 571-607.

Other

View, J.L. (2016). We who defy hate: Interfaith preparation for social justice action. Curriculum. Chicago: Meadville Lombard Theological School.

View, J.L. (2013, July). Stories of white Americans in the modern Civil Rights Movement: Four book reviews. Teaching for Change blog: http://bbpbooks.teachingforchange.org/stories-of-white-americans-civil-rights

View, J.L. (2013, April). Ask me about 1963. Teaching for Change blog: http://bbpbooks.teachingforchange.org/ask-me-about-1963

View, J.L. (2010). The modern Civil Rights Movement: A river of purposeful anger. Beyond the textbook: Civil rights movement. TeachingHistory.org, http://teachinghistory.org/history-content/beyond-the-textbook/24317

Other Information

Frank, T.J. & View, J.L. Examining the trajectories of Black mathematics teachers:  Learning from the past, drawing on the present and defining goals for the future. Three-year grant awared by  the National Science Foundation